Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

Middle East Censors Got You Down? How to Circumvent an Internet Proxy

June 16, 2009

Like many Americans, I have been riveted by the outpouring of dissent in Iran against the powers that be. It is amazing to see such a public expression of outrage in an oppressive society. And it is equally amazing that the government can’t seem to put a lid on it.

One fascinating element of this story is the role that the Internet is playing as an outlet for that dissent. There have been numerous reports that the Iranian government has blocked cell-phone calls and access to Facebook and other Web sites, and shut down text messaging services for two days.

So how do videos, pictures and blog posts keep popping up? Well, one reason may be that Iranian geeks are finding a way to run around the censors. Check out this video by Howcast, which was financed by the U.S. State Dep., which shows you how to circumvent Internet censors and keep publishing.

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Take 2: How Social Media Changes Your Business

May 23, 2008

My colleagues Stephen Baker and Heather Green wrote a fabulous update to their 2005 BusinessWeek cover story, Blogs Will Change Your Business.

It’s called Beyond Blogs: What Business Needs to Know, and you should definitely read it.

Since our 2005 story came out, a lot has changed in the blogosphere. Facebook, YouTube and Twitter barely even existed. As Steve and Hetaher write, “Three years ago, we wrote a big story—but missed a bigger one.”

The bigger story, of course, is the rise of social media–of which blogging is just a small but important part.

Here’s another snippet from the story encapsulating the shift we’ve seen the last few years:

“But blogs, it turns out, are just one of the do-it-yourself tools to emerge on the Internet. Vast social networks such as Facebook and MySpace offer people new ways to meet and exchange information. Sites like LinkedIn help millions forge important work relationships and alliances. New applications pop up every week. While only a small slice of the population wants to blog, a far larger swath of humanity is eager to make friends and contacts, to exchange pictures and music, to share activities and ideas.

These social connectors are changing the dynamics of companies around the world. Millions of us are now hanging out on the Internet with customers, befriending rivals, clicking through pictures of our boss at a barbecue, or seeing what she read at the beach. It’s as if the walls around our companies are vanishing and old org charts are lying on their sides.”