Posts Tagged ‘Heather Green’

Shout-Out to Departing BusinessWeek Colleagues

December 5, 2009

The most difficult part of Bloomberg’s acquisition of BusinessWeek has been seeing so many hugely talented colleagues and friends leave the operation. Five close coworkers of mine, most of whom I’ve been working with over the last nine years in the technology cluster, are no longer working for the tech team. Left coaster Rob Hof, Chicago correspondent Roger Crockett, and my three NY homies Steve Baker, Steve Hamm and Heather Green. Damn, that is a gaping hole you all have left!

Steve Baker Way BAck When
[Steve Baker On the Streets of El Paso]

It has been a pleasure and honor to work with all of you. Thanks for everything you’ve taught me over the years, and thanks for your camaraderie. I know we’re all going to keep in touch but the office will feel pretty empty without you all–especially the Mother Ship in NY. Best of luck in all of your new ventures and I’ll see ya on the 43rd floor, Playwright, University Cafe, etc. I have no doubt you will all go on to do different and interesting things, and I am eager to see each of you ramble down those new paths.

Virtual Rob Hof
[Real Rob Hof Posing with Virtual Rob Hof]

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Take 2: How Social Media Changes Your Business

May 23, 2008

My colleagues Stephen Baker and Heather Green wrote a fabulous update to their 2005 BusinessWeek cover story, Blogs Will Change Your Business.

It’s called Beyond Blogs: What Business Needs to Know, and you should definitely read it.

Since our 2005 story came out, a lot has changed in the blogosphere. Facebook, YouTube and Twitter barely even existed. As Steve and Hetaher write, “Three years ago, we wrote a big story—but missed a bigger one.”

The bigger story, of course, is the rise of social media–of which blogging is just a small but important part.

Here’s another snippet from the story encapsulating the shift we’ve seen the last few years:

“But blogs, it turns out, are just one of the do-it-yourself tools to emerge on the Internet. Vast social networks such as Facebook and MySpace offer people new ways to meet and exchange information. Sites like LinkedIn help millions forge important work relationships and alliances. New applications pop up every week. While only a small slice of the population wants to blog, a far larger swath of humanity is eager to make friends and contacts, to exchange pictures and music, to share activities and ideas.

These social connectors are changing the dynamics of companies around the world. Millions of us are now hanging out on the Internet with customers, befriending rivals, clicking through pictures of our boss at a barbecue, or seeing what she read at the beach. It’s as if the walls around our companies are vanishing and old org charts are lying on their sides.”

Will Apple Offer a Subscription Music Service (and Steve Jobs Eat Crow)?

March 23, 2008

How much will the recession hurt tech? Will subscription music ever take off? Do Facebook’s privacy controls solve the problem of too much info on the Web? Plus, March Madness picks in this week’s Digital Dish from BusinessWeek reporters Spencer Ante, Heather Green, Arik Hessehdahl and Catherine Holahan.

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Does AOL Have a Strategy?

March 17, 2008

Check out this week’s Digital Dish, where BusinessWeek reporters Spencer Ante, Heather Green, Arik Hesseldahl and Catherine Holahan discuss AOL’s buy of Bebo.com, the endgame in the Microsoft-Yahoo! mating dance and a South by Southwest wrap-up. It’s not all about the parties (really).

HOW TO BUY CREATIVE CAPITAL: To pre-order Creative Capital and get a 34% discount, click here and go to Amazon

Ding Ding Ding: Tech Fight Night

March 2, 2008

BusinessWeek puts the gloves on for tech fight night. In this week’s Digital Dish, BW reporters Spencer Ante, Heather Green, Arik Hesseldahl, and Catherine Holahan debate whether Microsoft, Google and Sprint deserve the whuppings they got this week. Plus, from the department of weird leading indicators, the Dish talks about the ginormous tab for Steve Jobs’ private corporate jet.

HOW TO BUY CREATIVE CAPITAL: To pre-order Creative Capital and get a 34% discount, click here and go to Amazon.com.

Did Steve Jobs Miss the Bullseye at Macworld?

January 19, 2008

BusinessWeek technology reporters Heather Green, Arik Hesseldahl, Catherine Holahan and Spencer Ante discuss Macworld, whether the tech sector is headed for a downturn, and the billion-dollar-plus buys of MySQL and BEA in this week’s broadcast of the Digital Dish.

My colleague Arik is bullish on the future prospects of Apple’s new online movie rental service. But I am less optimistic. Apple TV will get better and do better but it’s not a groundbreaking product like iTunes/iPod or the iPhone. Jobs can’t ride into the local square and save the day because there are already a few sheriffs in town. Netflix is the dominant player in online movie rentals and they are offering a download service for FREE with 6,000 movies and TV shows right now. Interestingly, the top five most-watched shows are all TV programs, according to the list on the NetFlix Web site on January 19: Heroes, The Office and 30 Rock.

As for Macworld, the maestro Jobs turned in a middling performance. He was due for one, no doubt. That’s the nature of creativity. Every film Martin Scorses makes can’t be a masterpiece like Raging Bull or Taxi Driver. Every once in a while you’re going to have a Casino or a Bringing Out the Dead. Macworld 2008 was the Casino of Steve Jobs career.