Posts Tagged ‘antitrust’

New Sheriff in Town: Exclusive with Obama Trustbuster Christine Varney

August 1, 2009

Check out my BusinessWeek story, based on the first extensive interview with the Obama Administration’s new head of antitrust enforcement, Christine A. Varney. Techies haven’t quite come to grips with the fact that there are new sheriffs in town. Big changes are coming with the way this and other industries are regulated, as you can see with the reaction to the Microsoft-Yahoo search deal and the FCC action on Apple. Read on.

The Antitrust Cop and the Tech Industry
Christine Varney aims to reinvigorate antitrust policy without stifling U.S. business, but Google and Intel could be among her targets

By Spencer E. Ante

Christine A. Varney, the nation’s top antitrust cop, is trying to pull off a delicate balancing act. She wants to reinvigorate antitrust policy after the laissez-faire years of the Bush Administration. Yet she also wants to avoid interfering with companies that compete vigorously but fairly. “This job is making sure the competitive marketplace is free from obstacles and barriers,” says Varney, whose official title is Assistant Attorney General at the Justice Dept. “We are thinking a lot about where bottlenecks might be in certain industries. If we can break through them it would be good for consumers.”

In her first extensive interview since taking office in April, Varney described an antitrust philosophy that is clearly more aggressive than in the recent past yet also less ideological than many businesspeople may expect. Varney says her goal is to bring antitrust law back to its historical center, not simply to go after giants because of their size. “We are not anti-big in any way, shape, or form,” says Varney, a former Federal Trade Commissioner who spent the past 12 years representing corporations as a partner at the Washington law firm Hogan & Hartson. “But with enormous success comes responsibility.”

Varney says the Justice Dept. will be taking a look at a range of industries including transportation and technology. Antitrust officials have also opened inquiries in agriculture, financial services, telecom, and health care, say sources familiar with the Justice Dept.’s activities.

Check out the rest of the story here.

Microsoft-Yahoo: Antitrust Hurdles Loom

July 30, 2009

The Microsoft-Yahoo search deal is no slam dunk, when it comes to antitrust matters. Check out my BusinessWeek story, out this morning.

Microsoft-Yahoo: Antitrust Hurdles Loom
The weak Web search-ad companies want to team up against No. 1 Google, but regulatory tradition and practice have long blocked such deals
By Spencer E. Ante

Don’t expect the Microsoft-Yahoo search deal to sail through a regulatory review. Sure, it’s tempting to think Justice Dept. officials won’t quibble much over a deal aimed at helping two struggling companies get a leg up against a market-leading competitor. That’s essentially the line taken by executives at Microsoft (MSFT) and Yahoo! (YHOO) to explain why their 10-year pact shouldn’t be held up by an antitrust review.

But legal experts say the deal is no slam dunk—especially with a new team of regulators in Washington eager to flex their antitrust muscles. Some lawyers and former regulators say the deal may even be quashed, or at least be subjected to revisions, before getting a green light. “Microsoft and Yahoo have a tough battle on their hands with the antitrust regulators,” says David Balto, former policy director of the Bureau of Competition at the Federal Trade Commission under the Clinton Administration. “We don’t want markets to become concentrated. It is like prescribing ice cream for someone who is overweight.”

The agreement is also likely to draw attention from European Union regulators who in recent years have been more aggressive than their U.S. counterparts in scrutinizing mergers and joint ventures. Google (GOOG) is the largest player in the search-ad market, with a 65% share. Together, Yahoo and Microsoft have about 28% of the market.

Under the pact outlined on July 29, Microsoft will provide the underlying search technology on Yahoo’s Web sites while Yahoo will take exclusive charge of search-related ads for both companies.

WALL STREET SEES “MATERIAL RISK”
Some legislators didn’t wait long before threatening to examine the deal closely. Senator Herbert Kohl (D-Wis.), who chairs the Senate antitrust subcommittee, said that the deal “warrants our careful scrutiny,” in a July 29 statement. “Our subcommittee is concerned about competition issues in these markets because of the potentially far-reaching consequences for consumers and advertisers and our concern about dampening the innovation we have come to expect from a competitive high-tech industry.”

Some Wall Street analysts are also sounding alarm bells. “We believe government approval is doable, but we continue to believe there is a material risk that the deal would be blocked or conditioned,” wrote Rebecca Arbogast, analyst with Stifel, Nicolaus (SF).

Microsoft and Yahoo are up against decades of antitrust policy and law that have rarely if ever allowed combinations of the No. 2 and No. 3 players in a given market. To win approval the companies will need to prove that eliminating one top player in the search-ad market will enhance competition and thereby benefit consumers and innovation. “The obvious fear of the antitrust guys is that instead of strengthening the runner-up, it reduces competition between No. 2 and No. 3, and that lessens competition,” says Lawrence J. White, a professor of economics at New York University who served as director of the Economic Policy Office of the Justice Dept.’s Antitrust Div.

Read the rest of the BusinessWeek story here, along with a video of me discussing the story with Peter Elstrom.

Questioning the Google-Yahoo Search Deal

September 13, 2008

BusinessWeek technology reporters Spencer Ante, Heather Green, Arik Hesseldahl and Catherine Holahan talk about new iPods and the health of Steve Jobs, the latest BlackBerry Pearl, and the Google-Yahoo antitrust investigation.

Check out the video here.

Also, today Joe Nocera from the New York Times devoted his column to questioning the Google-Yahoo search deal by focusing on the tale of Internet entrepreneur Dan Savage. Nocera was right in zeroing in on Google’s ability to set a price floor for search engine keywords. Determining whether or not this price-setting ability can have anti-competitive effects is likely to be a central question of the DoJ’s analysis, as BW’s Catherine Holahan points out in our Dish segment.