Microsoft-Yahoo: Antitrust Hurdles Loom

The Microsoft-Yahoo search deal is no slam dunk, when it comes to antitrust matters. Check out my BusinessWeek story, out this morning.

Microsoft-Yahoo: Antitrust Hurdles Loom
The weak Web search-ad companies want to team up against No. 1 Google, but regulatory tradition and practice have long blocked such deals
By Spencer E. Ante

Don’t expect the Microsoft-Yahoo search deal to sail through a regulatory review. Sure, it’s tempting to think Justice Dept. officials won’t quibble much over a deal aimed at helping two struggling companies get a leg up against a market-leading competitor. That’s essentially the line taken by executives at Microsoft (MSFT) and Yahoo! (YHOO) to explain why their 10-year pact shouldn’t be held up by an antitrust review.

But legal experts say the deal is no slam dunk—especially with a new team of regulators in Washington eager to flex their antitrust muscles. Some lawyers and former regulators say the deal may even be quashed, or at least be subjected to revisions, before getting a green light. “Microsoft and Yahoo have a tough battle on their hands with the antitrust regulators,” says David Balto, former policy director of the Bureau of Competition at the Federal Trade Commission under the Clinton Administration. “We don’t want markets to become concentrated. It is like prescribing ice cream for someone who is overweight.”

The agreement is also likely to draw attention from European Union regulators who in recent years have been more aggressive than their U.S. counterparts in scrutinizing mergers and joint ventures. Google (GOOG) is the largest player in the search-ad market, with a 65% share. Together, Yahoo and Microsoft have about 28% of the market.

Under the pact outlined on July 29, Microsoft will provide the underlying search technology on Yahoo’s Web sites while Yahoo will take exclusive charge of search-related ads for both companies.

WALL STREET SEES “MATERIAL RISK”
Some legislators didn’t wait long before threatening to examine the deal closely. Senator Herbert Kohl (D-Wis.), who chairs the Senate antitrust subcommittee, said that the deal “warrants our careful scrutiny,” in a July 29 statement. “Our subcommittee is concerned about competition issues in these markets because of the potentially far-reaching consequences for consumers and advertisers and our concern about dampening the innovation we have come to expect from a competitive high-tech industry.”

Some Wall Street analysts are also sounding alarm bells. “We believe government approval is doable, but we continue to believe there is a material risk that the deal would be blocked or conditioned,” wrote Rebecca Arbogast, analyst with Stifel, Nicolaus (SF).

Microsoft and Yahoo are up against decades of antitrust policy and law that have rarely if ever allowed combinations of the No. 2 and No. 3 players in a given market. To win approval the companies will need to prove that eliminating one top player in the search-ad market will enhance competition and thereby benefit consumers and innovation. “The obvious fear of the antitrust guys is that instead of strengthening the runner-up, it reduces competition between No. 2 and No. 3, and that lessens competition,” says Lawrence J. White, a professor of economics at New York University who served as director of the Economic Policy Office of the Justice Dept.’s Antitrust Div.

Read the rest of the BusinessWeek story here, along with a video of me discussing the story with Peter Elstrom.

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One Response to “Microsoft-Yahoo: Antitrust Hurdles Loom”

  1. apluscertificationhelp.com - » Blog Archive » Reaction to the Microsoft Word ruling Says:

    [...] The first option that occurred to me is that Microsoft would simply buy i4i, the company holding the patent that Microsoft infringed. However such action could incur the wrath of federal regulators, and Microsoft has been somwhat more reticent in recent years of taking actions that could be construed as anti-competitive. Their epic legal tangle with the Department of Justice may have been lost some years ago, but recent events show that their regulatory troubles haven’t ended just yet. [...]

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